Discussion Post: Role Of Parents In MG And YA Fantasy (Part 1)

Hello everyone, I would like to wish you a very happy Mother’s Day! I wanted to do something special on this occasion, so I came up with this idea for a discussion post – talking about the role of parents in today’s middle grade and young adult fantasy novels! I know it’s slightly long (thank goodness I decided to divide it into two parts!), but I’ve worked quite hard to put all this together, so I really hope you enjoy reading it and also express your opinions, since it is a discussion post. So without further ado, let’s start!


To put it bluntly, in most modern middle grade and young adult novels, the parents are neglected. And I am not even talking about the other characters’ parents, I am talking about the main character’s. I totally understand the reason. When the entire story is about a teenage girl who, one fine morning, discovers she has magical powers (just talking about a general thing here, not pointing to any book) why would anyone want to know about her mother? But including the parent(s) in the story does enhance it in some cases. I don’t know about you, but I would definitely love to see the parent-child relationship develop through the course of the story. But of course, there are also a lot of novels (especially MG) which involve the parents wholeheartedly.

In this post, we are going to go through the different types of roles parents have in MG and YA fantasies through the examples of popular books.


I think one of the most common parent-related trope is dead parent(s). It is very convenient to kill off one or both parents before the book even starts. I believe this is because a dead parent not only reduces the complexity of the story (no need to explain the main character’s relationship with them, etc), they also provide a certain backbone to the story, as the main character struggles to accept their deaths, or follow their footsteps etc. Dead parents usually mean that though they are not physically present throughout the events of the book, their presence is somehow felt. This trope has been executed in so different ways, some good, some not-so.

In The Mystwick School of Musicraft by Jessica Khoury, the main character Amelia lost her mother at a very early age, and after her death, her father disappeared. All Amelia wanted was to become a Maestro, because her mother was one. She chose flute (and that too her mother’s) as her instrument because her mother had been a flutist. And she wanted more than anything to go to Mystwick, because it was the music school her mother went too. Later in the book, she mentions (too many times!) that she felt very close to her late mother in Mystwick. And even later, her mother forms a huge part of the ending. I felt the story would have been better if it focused less on the dead mother and more on our main character.

We all know about Harry Potter. Orphaned when he was barely an infant, Harry learns more about his parents at Hogwarts. I like the little details we get, from Sirius and Snape and others, but maybe Harry could have shown a little more, I don’t know, like anger or sorrow or something for his parents throughout the series?

All’s not bad. I have come across books which have executed the dead parent trope wonderfully. Renegades by Marissa Meyer is a very good example. The murder of the mc’s (her name is Nova) parents and sister is actually shown in the very beginning, and after that it kinda takes a backseat. But it definitely fuels Nova’s hatred for the Renegades and her drive to destroy them. There are occasional mentions, enough for the reader to remember why Nova’s doing what she’s doing, but not enough to be irritating or repetitive. The perfect balance.


Then we have the parents who are very much alive, but not involved much in the story, in other words, the absent parents. I personally don’t favour this trope much. I mean, I know its fiction, but there should be something relatable, right? It is very unrealistic that the parent is totally unaware while their child is off riding dragons and/or meeting dwarves and/or nearly getting killed and what not.

In Orion Lost by Alastair Chrisholm, the adults are all in cyro sleep, leaving only the children aboard the spaceship to deal with everything. The mc’s mother and father are introduced at the beginning of the novel, but then they play no role throughout the story whatsoever. I am not saying its a bad thing, but you know, just absent parents.

Same is the case with Nevermoor series by Jessica Townsend. I mean, I loved all the three books (I rated them 5 stars!) but what I want to point out is that the mc’s father (her mother is dead) has no role throughout the trilogy except being mean to her in the first few pages of the first book.


And finally we have the books which actually give importance to the parents. I feel this one is the best there is. But you know what, I am not going to talk about these books in this post. I will be discussing these in the second part of this discussion. (Sorry if you came here only for these, but that next post will hopefully be worth the wait!)

Before you leave, I would like to share the results of a small survey I conducted. I put the following question forward to a group of readers –

In a YA or MG fantasy, would you prefer –

  1. Absent Parent (Little or no role in the story)
  2. Dead Parent
  3. Parent with an important role to play

The response was quite overwhelming and one-sided. A total of 85 people answered my question, out of which 73 of them favoured the last option i.e. parents with an important role to play. Of the remaining, 4 answered ‘dead parent’ and 8 chose ‘absent parent’. This means that about 85% prefer books with active parents. I think I agree with them, such books are fun to read.

Since so many of you like books with parent participation, this is what we will be (mostly) discussing in the second part of this discussion post, and teaser – I will be including some recs (books with active parents) too! Stay tuned, it won’t be long before the Part 2 goes up!

Which kind of fictional parents do you like best in MG and YA books? What are your thoughts on portrayal of parents in fantasy for young readers? Feel free to express your opinions in the comments, I would be more than happy to have a friendly discussion!

April Wrap-Up // a fantastic reading month!! (ft. me gushing about Shadow and Bone)

So another month gone by! Let’s take a look at my reading, blogging, blog-hopping and other highlights of the month.

April has been, by far, the best reading month this year! I read a total of 7 books, which is pretty impressive considering that I have been trying to level up from my boring 5 books per month since the beginning of this year.

Archenemies by Marissa Meyer [4 stars] Eh, this was one of those books where I was totally lost after the end. I had no idea whether to rate it 3 stars or 4 stars or 5 stars. But finally I settled with 4. At this point of time, I am like – Just tell everyone who Nightmare and Sentinel is!! And if you wanted to keep it secret forever, maybe it could have been unknown to the readers as well? Because it is getting kinda annoying now, to be honest.

The Mystwick School of Musicraft by Jessica Khoury [3 stars] My first audiobook! But what a disappointment the story was. It was too repetitive, to the point that so many things got downright irritating. And the beginning was nice enough, I don’t know what happened after that.

Artemis Fowl and the Opal Deception [4 stars] Actually I don’t remember much about this, but I do enjoy a good heist, so that was one of the reasons I gave this 4 stars.

A Wilder Magic by Juliana Brandt [4 stars] This was my first ever ARC!! I got this as a part of a book promo tour I did this month. It was such a beautiful middle grade with amazing platonic relationships. Read my full review HERE.

Book Scavenger by Jennifer Chambliss Bertman [4.5 stars] This was easily my favourite book of April. It definitely deserves a lot more hype, I have rarely heard bloggers mention this. There were equal parts mystery, friendship and adventure in Book Scavenger. To read my full review, see my journal spread and play a small bookish game inspired by Book Scavenger, click HERE.

The Infinity Courts by Akemi Dawn Bowman [1.5 stars] Well. I am still debating whether to put up a review for this on my blog or not, since I haven’t really posted a negative review here before, and this is also a very new release. But I did post a review on Goodreads, you can read it HERE.

Misfit (Asura Chronicles #1) by Jo Zaida [3 stars] Another ARC!! So I didn’t enjoy it as much as I had expected to, but it was worth reading anyways. Review to come!

I am proud to report that I carefully followed the posting schedule I had set up for myself last month (except for last week, when I had a blog tour post out of schedule, on a Sunday) throughout the month of April! When I started, I didn’t think I would be able to follow it throughout, to be honest, but turns out I was wrong!

I am not going to link all my posts from this month here, only specific ones. If you would like to see all my posts in April, click HERE.

I have included the links to my posts in their featured images below, so all you have to do is click on the ones that catch your attention!

A discussion post all about book titles! I am quite proud of this one actually, so do check it out if you missed it earlier!
I do love writing 5 star reviews!!
I created a quiz for you to find some great recs!!

I tried to be really active on all of your posts this month, and I think I succeeded to a great extent. I interacted with your blogs wherever I could, and came across some interesting posts in the process.

Amy @A Fangirl’s Opinion wrote about some funny books and characters on April Fools day!

April @Booked Till Midnight shared her recipe for a 5 star read!

Alice @Love For Words related Pride and Prejudice quotes to her everyday life! I have not read Pride and Prejudice completely (I’ve read only short excerpts) but this humorous post had me chuckling out aloud!

Ritz @Living, Loving and Reading Netflix’s Shadow And Bone and her thoughts are SO similar to mine!!

Ashmita @the fictional journal made a list of characters who are likely to jump-scare people!

Ritz @Living, Loving and Reading gives us some great sci-fi recs and also shares her sci-fi tbr!


Other updates and highlights of the month

  • We hit 100 followers in early April!! This is my first big blogging milestone, so thank you so much for that guys๐Ÿฅฐ It means a lot to have you enjoy and appreciate my content.
  • The Home page of my blog now has a brand new look! I have changed the header image, put in a sidebar and stuff like that.
  • My blog now has a Review Policy page.
  • I received my first ARCs and took part in my first blog tour this month!
  • April was Shadow and Bone month!!!! (oops sorry for all the exclamations, this just shows how much I loved the show) By now, you all know how much the Six Of Crows duology means to me. If you don’t, IT’S MY FAVOURITE BOOK OF ALL TIME!! So naturally I was excited for the S&B show on Netflix. Though I started watching it only for the Crows, the Alina-Darkling storyline also got me hooked and made me wonder why I didn’t read the Shadow and bone trilogy earlier (I am not going to read it now, I want to know the story only from the show). I finished watching all 8 episodes of S&B in four days, and wow I loved seeing my favourite characters brought to life. The casting was just perfect. Freddy Carter is going to be stuck in my mind’s eye as Kaz forever, and same with the others. I didn’t think it was possible to love and admire Kaz more than I did after reading the books, but this show proved me wrong…my heart went out for him even more!! The ‘No mourners, no funerals’ line was also so perfect when it happened. Jesper and Milo were absolute showstealers!! Okay, not gonna ramble any more, but seriously, go watch it!!

How was your April? Did you watch Shadow And Bone? Have you read any of the books that I read in April? Chat with me in the comments!!

“What’s In The Name?”

Turns out, a lot IS in the name. Listen up, Shakespeare.

This idea just popped up in my mind this morning, so this is pretty spontaneous. In this discussion post, we are going to be looking at how important book titles are, which kind of titles make me take a second look at the book (and which do not) and some of my personal favourite titles. Make yourself comfortable because we are starting…now!

The title of a book is like the first impression the reader gets of the book, perhaps even more so than the cover. The title forms the basis of reader’s judgement about the book. It is the title that gets talked about in general conversations, making it incredibly important for it to be a word or a set of words which catches people’s attention. The title is what is mentioned in as the heading of book review posts on blogs, and other social media.

Most people (including me) would not even care to read the book’s synopsis if the title does not sound good to them. When I am scrolling through Goodreads, I stop only when a title catches my attention. Then I look at the blurb, and then I take a look a the cover, the genres and the ratings. So the very first basis in which I decide to add a book to my tbr is the title, and the rest comes later. Of course, a good title can’t make a boring book look good, but it can definitely make an interesting book seem better. Ultimately, the title should be such that it makes you want to start reading the story.

  • A title that uses some reference from the story, without giving away too much.
  • A title whose real meaning becomes relevant only when I am quite far into the book. (That moment when I finally understand is like a lightbulb turning on in my head๐Ÿ˜‚)
  • Titles with puns, or some sort of word play
  • Titles that are easy to pronounce and understand
  • Vague one-word titles
  • A surreal title that ignites curiosity on hearing it for the first time

  • The word ‘and’ as a connector. I mean, I have nothing against it as such, but titles like “A and the B” (not a real book title! I am just giving an example) really discourage me from reading the book. It’s completely all right with children’s books and picture books (remember Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs?) but middle grade and young adult having such titles…its usually a no-go for me.
  • Very obvious book titles, which are the names of the main character or the main setting. Any title whose meaning becomes obvious as soon as we start reading the book.

(these are purely my opinions, I do not mean to disregard or offend anyone)

Alright, time for some of my favourite titles! This is going to be interesting….*cracks knuckles*

Mightier Than the Sword (The Clifton Chronicles, #5)
Supernova (Renegades, #3)
An Ember in the Ashes (An Ember in the Ashes, #1)

Mightier Than The Sword by Jeffrey Archer : Can you think of any better way to describe an author? There could have been so many other boring names for this one, but instead the author took up a phrase “The pen is mightier than the sword” and removed the first three words. So impressive, right?

Supernova by Marissa Meyer is the third and final book in the Renegades series. If you don’t have any clue about the story, this may not sound like a very impressive title. But actually this title is a pun, and a good one at that. Its not the supernova as in the “space explosion”, it is supernova as in “the mc’s name is Nova, the book is about superheroes, and Nova is a villain”. Now can you see the genius behind that title?! (And I haven’t read this book yet, but I have read the first two, so I will probably get this this one soon)

An Ember In The Ashes by Sabaa Tahir : Although I didn’t enjoy this book very much, that can’t stop me from appreciating the title, can it? What I liked about this was how initially the reader has no idea why the book is named the way it is, and later on, I think about halfway through the book, this appears for the first time as a quote. “You are an ember in the ashes, Elias Veterius.”,something like this, if I remember correctly?

The First Phone Call from Heaven
And Then There Were None
Thirteen Reasons Why

The First Phone Call From Heaven by Mitch Albom : What an intriguing title! Doesn’t the title itself make most of you want to read this book? And the book was pretty good too, from what I remember.

And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie gave me chills from the moment I read the name of the book. And that might be one of the reasons I was so hesitant to read it. Yeah I am a scaredy cat. And it has sort of a nice ring to it, doesn’t it? And then there were none…

13 Reasons Why I think I am talking about this on my blog for the first time! I had read it a couple years back and didn’t really enjoy it that much. But. We are here to talk about the title, so isn’t this a nice, unique one? Kinda makes me feel its the start of an essay. 13 reasons why polar bears are going extinct…okay that just popped into my head ๐Ÿ™ƒ


Before ending this post, I wanted to share a completely random word fact : Today I realized that the words LUSTRE, RUSTLE and RESULT have exactly the same letters in different arrangements. How’s that?๐Ÿ˜

How important do you think book titles are? Are there any books you picked up because of their title? Which are your favourite book titles? Any discussion post remains incomplete without your inputs, so be sure to put your thoughts in the comments section!

October TBR (Page-a-thon and Colour-a-thon!)

October is a month of firsts! For the first time ever I will be participating in more than one readathon in a month. This will also be the first time I have made a proper bullet journal spread for the readathons (a bullet journal flipthrough coming soon!). And I will also be starting 4 new series this month! Exciting, right?

To start off, this month I am joining two readathons; Page-athon and Colour-athon. I belong to Team Spring for the former and Team Blue for the latter. Since my team for Colour-athon binds me to read only blue-covered books this month, that is what I am going to do (with a couple exceptions, of course!). So be ready to dive into a TBR full of blue books! All book covers at the end!!

THE BOOKS!!

Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer

This will be one of the new series I am going to begin. I have been waiting since forever to watch the movie, but since that wish couldn’t be fulfilled (why don’t I have the Hotstar premium subscription?!) I decided to read the book. A boy nearly my age, always in a suit, AND a kidnapper! A perfect read for me!

Nightfall by Shannon Messenger

As some of you may already know, I have been pursuing The Keeper of Lost Cities series since August. Nightfall is the 6th book in the series (I can’t believe I’ve read 5 books about Sophie Foster already!). This book will also get me some extra points for Page-athon (I assume the ‘fall’ in Nightfall can be counted as an ‘Autumn related word’!) and it fulfills the colour criteria for Colour-athon, so there was every reason for this book to be included in my TBR!

Flashback by Shannon Messenger

This, as some of you might have guessed, is the 7th book in the Keeper Of Lost Cities series. It also has a tinge of blue, so I thought, why not?

School for Good and Evil by Soman Chainani

I have been wanting to read this book for the last two months, but never got around to it. This will be the first book in the School for Good and Evil series, and I look forward to it!

The Unwanteds by Lisa McMann

This is the only non-blue book on my TBR. I really, really wanted to start this series, and I couldn’t wait till next month, so I decided to put it on my TBR, even if it doesn’t count for Colour-athon. It still does get me some points for Page-athon, so no worries!

The Island Of Silence by Lisa McMann

This is the second book in the Unwanteds series, so if I like the first one, and if I am in a mood, I am going to read this one as well. And…it is blue (kind of)!

Ice Wolves by Amie Kaufman

Another start of a series! This one is the first novel in the Elementals series, and was kind of a last-minute addition to my TBR. This one is kind of a blind read, I just read the name and a little bit of the reviews, otherwise I have no idea what this book is about!

Vimana by Mainak Dhar

I read very few novels by Indian authors (even though I am an Indian myself), but I decided to go for this one. Who can resist some mythology, right?

THE COVERS!!

And that was my TBR for October. What are you planning on reading in October? Are you participating in any readathons? Let me know your views on my TBR as well as yours, in the comments section. Bye, till my next post!

The Infernal Devices Trilogy (Review)

After finishing the Mortal Instruments Series, I was somewhat obsessed with the fantasy world Cassandra Clare had created. I became irresistibly drawn to the life and world of the Shadowhunters, and that is why I picked up the Infernal Devices trilogy, which is a prequel to the MI series.

I had high hopes of the books in this trilogy, and I must say, they lived up to my expectations. I devoured all these three books last week, and as it often happens with books in a series, now I can’t separate the stories of the three. All three books make up one story for me. So, this is going to be a combined review for the entire trilogy, not the individual books.

THE CHARACTERS

They say that the real story is not the plot, but how the characters unfold by it. So in this review, the characters are the main thing I am going to talk about. In the trilogy, there were few characters, but they left lasting impressions.

Tessa, who can be called the main character of the entire trilogy, was not exactly how I hoped she would be. Call me the heroine hater (I made that up right now, not sure if it even is a term), but she was definitely not my favourite character. I mean, she made terrible decisions all the time, endangering her life as well as of those who were near her. Although everyone tried to tell her otherwise, she WAS actually the reason the lives of everybody at the Institute had turned upside down. They were better off before they took her in, is all I have to say.

Jem. Jem was that character in the story for whom you continue reading the book. He was also that character that made me feel that I would give anything just to go to him, keep a hand on his shoulder, and tell him everything was going to be all right. Through the first book, Clockwork Angel, his illness was a mystery. In the second, we come to know more about his disease, and in the third…well, I can’t really tell you what happens, that would be a dreadful spoiler. But know this, he is the only person in the entire trilogy who is actually, and completely ‘good’, if there is such a thing in this world.

And Will. Will was an…interesting character. Throughout the trilogy, I kept making different impressions of him, as the story progressed. It would be nearly impossible to describe him in a mere couple of words. He was the complex, misunderstood, shrouded-in-mystery character. And although he reminded me of Jace (from the Mortal Instruments series) a lot, Jace was nowhere near to Will in passion and mystery. What I liked about Will was his impulsiveness, his fierce protectiveness of his parabatai, Jem, and his love for novels and poetry.

And of course, all the side characters were charming. The determined Charlotte, the delightful Henry, the Lightwood brothers, Sophie, Magnus Bane( oh, and I AM eyeing the Bane chronicles next) and Mortmain, all did their bits to make up such a wonderful story.

THE PLOT

Although the plot of the entire trilogy was very attractive, and kept me hooked throughout, I wouldn’t say it was entirely unique. There are so many books with the same storyline – the main character is something like the ‘Chosen One’, the fate of the world lies in his or her hands, then he/she gets kidnapped, then there is a rescue, blah blah. So I really had expected something a little more different, but never mind.

THE SETTING

This entire trilogy was set in London, in the 1880’s. This was interesting because there were no cell phones, and because of this the characters were in constant dilemma of how to contact the others and tell them of the danger that lies in await. There were also no cars, and in the ‘rescue’ part of the story, Will rushed off on horseback and traveled through an entire city to rescue Tessa (the horse he took died later, in case you are wondering). I believe due to the year chosen, in contrast to the time of the Mortal Instruments, which was set in the 21st century only, I wanted to read on and find more about the lifestyle of people in those days.

Have you read any of the books of this trilogy? How did you find them? Do you have any recommendations on what I should read next? Feel free to share your views in the comments!

3 things I learnt after reading ‘The Wave’ by Morton Rhue

‘The Wave’ by Morton Rhue was a book that left a lasting impact on my mind, and I am sure it will do the same to you as well. Perhaps if you check out my book review of this very novel The Wave by Morton Rhue (Review) you will get a better understanding of what I am going to talk about in this post.

Here are the 3 main lessons that this amazing novel taught me –

  1. Past horrors can repeat themselves : Though we may believe that horrible crimes, like those done by the Nazis, are purely historical, that is not the case. These behaviors are human, and instead of fading with time, such impulses have only grown within us. The high school students were sure that they would never succumb to and blindly follow the orders of a dictator, like the Germans followed Hitler. But they were wrong. Even on knowing so much of history, they became what we can call a ‘mini Nazi army’.

2. It is very easy to become a part of a group, but very difficult to come out of it and regain your lost individuality : The students in the book had become one unified group, with actions so co-ordinated that it felt as if they were joint together with some invisible bond. They lost their individuality and forgot that each one of them was unique. It is very difficult to overcome group-thinking, and this was what was the main idea of this novel.

3. Not all quick reads are brief and boring : I always used to steer clear of short novels, because for some reason, I felt that they got over too quickly, without narrating the actual story. The Wave begs to differ. The story was comprise, and surprisingly detailed at the same time. After reading this book, I have begun to think that perhaps the length of the novel does not matter as much as the impact the story leaves behind. Yes, not-so-lengthy books, prepared to be devoured!

These were some things I learnt after reading this book. What did this novel teach you? And do you think, like some others, that the Wave did more good than bad? And if you have not read this novel yet, do you plan on reading it now? Do let me know your views in the comments section.

See you in my next post. Till then, happy reading!

Black Coffee by Agatha Christie (Review)

When the inventor, Sir Claud Amory, discovers that his precious formula for a powerful explosivehas been stolen, he is sure it has been done by someone in his house. Seeking a swift remedy, he locks all doors and switches off the lights to allow the thief to return the formula, no questions asked. But little did he know that he would not live to even regret this decision.

This was a classic ‘the murderer is in this room’ mystery, which I would have otherwise enjoyed, had it not been for the weak plot. Yes, this was one of those rare Christie novels that I had high hopes on, but I was let down. The beginning of the novel was quite promising, but I was disappointed in the end.

Let me tell you, as a Christie fan, that most of the murderers in her books can be of two categories. They are either the main character, whose name has been used throughout the book, or they are a character who has been completely ignored in the story, someone you would never dream of suspecting. The murderer in ‘Black Coffee’ fell under non of these categories, which is quite uncharacteristic of Agatha Christie.

So all I can say is while the story-line was good, the end could have been a whole lot better, because in murder-mysteries like this, it is the end that matters.

Still, it is definitely worth a shot. Who knows, you may even like it! Anyway, everyone has their own taste, and I would love to know your views about this book in the comments section!

Animal Farm by George Orwell (Review)

Animal Farm -

‘All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others’ ~ Animal Farm

Such meaning lies in this line. It tells you more about the book than I ever could. But still, I will try.

In the story, the animals of Animal Farm, or Mayor Farm as it was previously called, rebel against their drunk and irresponsible farmer, in the hopes of creating a society where all the animals were treated fairly and equally. They overthrow all humans and decided to run the farm themselves, and for a while, everyone was happy and free. A list called ‘The Seven Commandments’ was made, which laid down the seven primary rules that all animals had to follow. But very soon this ideal society gets destroyed, and all the animals find themselves under the dictatorship of a pig named Napoleon.

Very soon, the pigs declared themselves as the leaders and began to resemble humans – they walked upright, carried whips, drank alcohol and wore clothes. Even the Seven Commandments were altered by them. ‘All animals are equal‘ changed to ‘All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others‘ and ‘four legs good, two legs bad’ was changed to ‘four legs good, two legs better’.

The last page of this amazing novel describes men and pigs playing cards together, both of them cheating throughout the game, praising and arguing with each other, and the other animals who stood outside watching the pigs and the men, could suddenly not distinguish between the two.

Now still if you want my opinion of my book, all I will say is that it is definitely worth reading as well as recommending to others. So do read this unique and relatable novel as soon as you can.

See you in my next book worm-ish post! Till then, happy reading!

Let’s Talk Villains! ๐Ÿ˜ˆ๐Ÿ˜ˆ

Villains are perhaps the most important part of any novel. They may not be very likable in most cases, but if everyone did the right thing all the time and never hurt anyone, literature wouldn’t probably exist, right?

Anyway, there can be several types of villains. The most common types can be called (for all the Potter heads out there) the ‘Snapes’, the ‘Voldemorts’ and the ‘Malfoys’.

Let’s start with the ‘Malfoy’ type of villains. These are the people that I dislike the most. They are merely puppets of the evil mastermind, and are so stupid that they actually believe that they are going to get some benefit out of whatever they are doing. Of course, sometimes such types of villains are forced to do the dirty work because a member of their family has been kept hostage or something like that, but in most cases, it is done voluntarily. Almost in all the books I have read, the ‘Malfoys’ are easily defeated by the protagonist, and the mastermind himself has to fight. So there.

Next come the ‘Voldemorts’. These are portrayed as people in whom all the evil in the universe is residing. We hardly find any good traits in such characters. It is such type of villains that make us realize the protagonist’s goodness. Usually, they are equally or perhaps even more skilled than the hero of the story, and make the readers respect them, without wanting to. What? I don’t like Voldemort, but he is pretty talented with his wand, you have got to admit. Generally a novel ends with an epic battle between the ‘Voldemort’ of the story and the protagonist.

Finally, the ‘Snapes’. I know, I know, many of you would be crying out that he wasn’t actually a villain, but wasn’t he?

Such villains are the ones who are the most difficult to understand. Often, as in the case of the real Snape, they are double agents, with loyalties on both the sides. Even after you put down the novel, you think, “Was he the good guy or the bad guy?” If we try to think about it, we find several justifications for all the actions of such people. Everything they do, is for a reason, however complex, known only to them. Betrayal is a common trait associated with such characters.

So are there any more types of the ‘bad guys’ you have read about? Who do you and whom don’t you like? Comment below and let me know your views.

Bye, and happy reading!

Meet me. A bookworm. Just like you!

Hey there, book-lovers! First things first. I am Rachel, 13, and (this you probably would have guessed) love reading books. I am interested in literature and write short stories as well as compose poetry. I read novels of almost all genres, and would be sharing their reviews with you here. I would also be posting a whole lot of other things related to books and reading.

See you in my next post, and (you will be hearing this a lot from me) happy reading!